Experience: Cross-Technology Radio Respiratory Monitoring Performance Study

Authors:
Peter Hillyard Xandem Technology
Anh Luong Carnegie Mellon University
Alemayehu Solomon Abrar University of Utah
Neal Patwari University of Utah, Xandem Technology
Krishna Sundar, Robert Farney, And Jason Burch Health Sciences Center, University of Utah
Christina A. Porucznik Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine
Sarah Pollard Department of Surgery, University of Utah School of Medicine

Introduction:

This paper addresses the performance of systems which use commercial wireless devices to make bistatic RF channel measurements for non-contact respiration sensing. In this paper, the authors deploy an extensive real-world comparative human subject study.

Abstract:

This paper addresses the performance of systems which use commercial wireless devices to make bistatic RF channel measurements for non-contact respiration sensing. Published research has typically presented results from short controlled experiments on one system. In this paper, we deploy an extensive real-world comparative human subject study. We observe twenty patients during their overnight sleep (a total of 160 hours), during which contact sensors record groundtruth breathing data, patient position is recorded, and four diferent RF breathing monitoring systems simultaneously record measurements. We evaluate published methods and algorithms. We find that WiFi channel state information measurements provide the most robust respiratory rate estimates of the four RF systems tested. However, all four RF systems have periods during which RF-based breathing estimates are not reliable.

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