Experience: Android Resists Liberation From Its Primary Use Case

Authors:
Noah Klugman University of California Berkeley
Veronica Jacome University of California Berkeley
Meghan Clark University of California Berkeley
Matthew Podolsky University of California Berkeley
Patrick Pannuto University of California Berkeley
Neal Jackson University of California Berkeley
Aley Soud Nassor State University of Zanzibar
Catherine Wolfram And Duncan Callaway University of California Berkeley
Jay Taneja University of Massachusetts Amherst
Prabal Dutta University of California Berkeley

Introduction:

Network connectivity is often one of the most challenging aspects of deploying sensors. the authors find that a device designed for multi-tenant operation and frequent human interaction becomes unreliable when tasked to continuously run a single application with no human interaction, a somewhat counter-intuitive result.

Abstract:

Network connectivity is often one of the most challenging aspects of deploying sensors. In many countries, cellular networks provide the most reliable, highest bandwidth, and greatest coverage option for internet access. While this makes smartphones a seemingly ideal platform to serve as a gateway between sensors and the cloud, we find that a device designed for multi-tenant operation and frequent human interaction becomes unreliable when tasked to continuously run a single application with no human interaction, a somewhat counter-intuitive result. Further, we find that economy phones cannot physically withstand continuous operation, resulting in a surprisingly high rate of permanent device failures in the field. If these observations hold more broadly, they would make mobile phones poorly suited to a range of sensing applications for which they have been rumored to hold great promise.

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